What is Human Trafficking?

The Set Me Free Project

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www.setmefreeproject.net

The Set Me Free Project is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Education and Awareness

 

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The Set Me Free Project understands that when we bring awareness and education to the masses, traffickers lose their power. We are available to come to your schools, youth groups, and communities. As we provide information to students, youth, parents, leaders, and educators, we empower our children and young adults to value themselves and protect them from the evils of trafficking, social media dangers, and cyber bullying.

We can come to your school for a school assembly or directly into your classrooms. We can provide education to teachers, administration, and leaders in the community.

With a curriculum specifically for youth and a separate curriculum for parents, we provide knowledge on the importance of social media safety and the importance of human dignity and value. We equip youth and parents with the information to keep our kids safe and help them understand their unique value.

We offer full events to youth groups. A day of fun and empowerment!

Contact us at info@setmefreeproject.net or at (402) 521-3080 or (800) 716-9853 to arrange for us to come to your school, church, or community!

 

(All of the information below is taken from the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (http://www.polarisproject.org)

What is Human Trafficking?

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery where people profit from the control and exploitation of others. As defined under U.S. federal law, victims of human trafficking include children involved in the sex trade, adults age 18 or over who are coerced or deceived into commercial sex acts, and anyone forced into different forms of "labor or services," such as domestic workers held in a home, or farm-workers forced to labor against their will. The factors that each of these situations have in common are elements of force, fraud, or coercion that are used to control people.  Then, that control is tied to inducing someone into commercial sex acts, or labor or services.  Numerous people in the field have summed up the concept of human trafficking as "compelled service."  Every year, human traffickers generate billions of dollars in profits by victimizing millions of people around the world, and here in the United States.  Human trafficking is considered to be one of the fastest growing criminal industries in the world.

What is Sex Trafficking?

Sex trafficking occurs when people are forced or coerced into the commercial sex trade against their will.  Child sex trafficking includes any child involved in commercial sex.  Sex traffickers requently target vulnerable people with histories of abuse and then use violence, threats, lies, false promises, debt bondage, or other forms of control and manipulation to keep victims involved in the sex industry.  Sex trafficking exists within the broader commercial sex trade, often at much larger rates than most people realize or understand.  Sex trafficking has been found in a wide variety of venues of the overall sex industry, including residential brothels, hostess clubs, online escort services, fake massage businesses, strip clubs, and street prostitution.

What is Labor Trafficking?

Labor traffickers use violence, threats, lies, and other forms of coercion to force people to work against their will in many different industries.  Common types of labor trafficking include people forced to work in homes as domestic servants, farmworskers coerced through violence as they harvest crops, or factory workers held in inhumane conditionswith little to no pay.  In the United States, these forms of forced labor are more prevalent than many people realize.  However, Polaris and others working in the human trafficking field are learning more on a daily basis about the different types of labor trafficking that exist amongst us.  In the United States, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) defines labor trafficking as: “The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage or slavery.”

Do You Know Someone Who is Being Trafficked?

Are you or someone you know being trafficked? Is human trafficking happening in your community? Is the situation you may have encountered actually human trafficking?

The following is a list of potential red flags and indicators of human trafficking to help you recognize the signs.


If you see any of these red flags, contact the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or text to BeFree (233733) for specialized victim services referrals or to report the situation. This list is not exhaustive and represents only a selection of possible indicators. Also, the red flags in this list may not be present in all trafficking cases and are not cumulative.

Common Work and Living Conditions: The Individual(s) in Question

  • Is not free to leave or come and go as he/she wishes
  • Is under 18 and is providing commercial sex acts
  • Is in the commercial sex industry and has a pimp / manager
  • Is unpaid, paid very little, or paid only through tips
  • Works excessively long and/or unusual hours
  • Is not allowed breaks or suffers under unusual restrictions at work
  • Owes a large debt and is unable to pay it off
  • Was recruited through false promises concerning the nature and conditions of his/her work
  • High security measures exist in the work and/or living locations (e.g. opaque windows, boarded up windows, bars on windows, barbed wire, security cameras, etc.)

Poor Mental Health or Abnormal Behavior

  • Is fearful, anxious, depressed, submissive, tense, or nervous/paranoid
  • Exhibits unusually fearful or anxious behavior after bringing up law enforcement
  • Avoids eye contact

Poor Physical Health

  • Lacks health care
  • Appears malnourished
  • Shows signs of physical and/or sexual abuse, physical restraint, confinement, or torture

Lack of Control

  • Has few or no personal possessions
  • Is not in control of his/her own money, no financial records, or bank account
  • Is not in control of his/her own identification documents (ID or passport)
  • Is not allowed or able to speak for themselves (a third party may insist on being present and/or translating)

Other

  • Claims of just visiting and inability to clarify where he/she is staying/address
  • Lack of knowledge of whereabouts and/or do not know what city he/she is in
  • Loss of sense of time
  • Has numerous inconsistencies in his/her story

End Slavery

 

 

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